Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘self-publishing’

Hey All,

I assume most of the people reading this blog are interested in things literary. Why else would you be reading this? All I talk about is books! So let’s talk about books. And publishing. And graphic novels. And acquisitions. And agents. And young adult writing. And…..everything else? I can’t talk about everything and frankly you wouldn’t want me to! I’m not an expert, just a girl with a little obsession.

But there’s a conference next month where experts WILL be talking about these things. Write to Publish, or Oolicon, will be May 22-23. I will be there both days, to check out the local literary scene on Sunday, but mostly to learn from the experts on Saturday.

Here’s the workshops I find most interesting:

Young Adults Trends and Audience (Sara Ryan, two-time Oregon Book Award winner in the YA category): Young adult (YA) fiction is one of the most lively and profitable genres in publishing. Get an overview of current and upcoming trends and tips on writing for this diverse and voracious audience.

Graphic Novels: Publishing and Process (Brett Warnock, head publisher, Top Shelf Productions; Aaron Colter, marketing coordinator, Dark Horse Comics): Graphic novels are more popular now than ever before. The intricacies of the publishing process for this genre are varied and unique, and new technologies have created exciting possibilities for graphic novel writers and readers. This workshop will examine the opportunities and difficulties inherent in the creation of graphic novels. Learn the importance of design and marketing in this medium.

Writers, Conventions, and the Web: A Friendship (Bo Johnson, head publisher, Bowler Hat Comics): Learn about building your presence on the web and how conventions can help you get your foot in the door. This workshop will give you the tools you need to make your next convention visit more productive. Learn the many ways to network and promote yourself as an author.

So, everyone, buy your tickets for the workshops NOW!! Support Ooligan, of course, but really this is for writers –  to help authors learn about the industry from the experts. Be there or be square. Plus, Ursula K. LeGuin will be there – now there’s an author worth obsessing over.

Workshops: HERE.

Industry Mingle and Author Stage: HERE.

Read Full Post »

I’m going to be honest – at some level, I’m using this blog as my own personal sounding board. I write about what I’m thinking about, what’s bothering me, and what I need to figure out for Ooligan Press, for The Grove Review, for Carol White Marketing, or for my job.

Right now, I’m trying to figure out how to market The Grove Review’s Issue 5.

Here’s my list so far, in no particular order:

  1. Press Release for Issue 5’s release and party
  2. Create new website, with blog, and get articles from past contributors
  3. Plan a release party
  4. Create a Facebook plan/Possibly also Twitter
  5. Schedule/register for local conferences
  6. Send a mailing to current and past subscribers and contributors
  7. Set up e-issues for online purchase
  8. Schedule/plan a reading for authors
  9. Get reviews (post on website and contributors’ websites)
    (Design ad/link for contributors’ websites)
  10. Create swag for conferences and release party (bookmarks)

And how does that sound? It seems to me like this plan should appeal to those who love online outlets while not leaving out those who still like getting old-fashioned pieces of mail. I’d love some feedback.

Read Full Post »

According to the AAP (the Association of American Publishers), book sales fell about 1.8% in 2009.

Here’s the breakdown of the report:

Sales went up in 2009 for the following:
Adult hardbound books
Paperbound books for children and juveniles
E-books
Higher education books

Sales went down in 2009 for the following:
Paperbound books
Hardbound books for children and juveniles
Mass market paperbacks
Mail order and book club sales
Audio books
Religious books
Elementary and high school books

Stayed about the same:
Trade sales of adult books
Trade sales of juvenile books

I would like to point out, before the pessimists take over, that the publishing industry, according to the AAP, still saw $23.9 billion in sales in 2009. And the economy hasn’t been great, so the fall of sales was actually pretty understandable. And e-book sales went up about 700%.

Read Full Post »

This is probably going to upset a few people, but I don’t see the difference between vanity presses and self-publishing.

With both types of printing, the author is footing the bill to publish their own work. In traditional publishing, the press covers the costs in hopes that they will recoup their money through sales. With both self-publishing and vanity publishing, the author is responsible for marketing and sales and often has trouble getting their books into bookstores (though this problem is increasingly solvable).

With self-publishing and vanity publishing, the author is also responsible for edits. They can pay their printer (like Lulu or Createspace) for the editing service, but again that money is coming out of the author’s pocket. In traditional publishing, the book is edited by the employees (or freelancers) paid by the press.

The exact same is true for book design. You can pay for someone to design the book cover and interior, but the quality is often much lower than if a traditional press took the project.

There are several other differences, but my point is this: try traditional publishing first. There are tons of small presses out there, and if your writing is good, one of them will want your work. Otherwise, you are publishing your own work and let’s face it – that’s pretty much vanity publishing. And I, for one, still assume that a self-published work is going to be of lesser quality than a traditionally published work since usually the editing, design, and marketing will all be done by a less experienced individual.

Read Full Post »

I was reading Booksquare today, and I noticed an old post from Nov. 2009 called Trendwatching 2010, and I wanted to add my two cents (per usual). Here’s a couple predictions about how publishing will evolve in the next couple years or so.

1) E-books will be huge (duh!) and BOTH the Kindle and the iPad will continue to be popular.
2) E-book prices will actually get higher – some will be at $9.99 or below for a while, but publishers will probably make $14.99 the standard, and some books will be even more expensive as time goes on. Publishers will realize that people will pay these prices.
3) A lot more small presses will use on-demand publishing. And on-demand publishing will eventually become the standard (I’m talking about 5 years from now, not right away) because it doesn’t require such a commitment of time or money.
4) Sales to China will increase exponentially, and all foreign rights will be a much more important money-maker for publishers.
5) Self-publishing will be increasingly more accepted, and publishers will actually find some of their bestselling books from among these authors. And we will see a Self-Published section in many bookstores.
6) Almost every big book or author will have book trailers, websites, and blogs. Some already do, but book trailers will be a HUGE marketing tool – much more important to marketing plans than they are now.
7) Independent bookstores will all have Book Espresso Machines.
8) The hottest genres will be Young Adult, Horror, and Paranormal Romance.

Some of these are pretty obvious, but I think it’s good to remember that publishing isn’t a stagnant industry – it’s changing so much that we all need to grow with it, quickly.

Read Full Post »

There’s been a lot of discussion about whether self-publishing is better or worse than publishing through more traditional channels. So I thought it was interesting that prominent author John Edgar Wideman has decided to self-publish his new book Briefs: Stories for the Palm of theMind with Lulu.

Wideman has won several awards, and was a National Book Award finalist. Currently, Briefs is only available through Lulu, but will be released with an ISBN in a few weeks. When asked why he self-published, he answered, “Why not?” Which is a really great answer coming from an author who is already established and tenured.

But what about the people who haven’t been published before? What incentives does self-publishing offer? Not many right now, honestly, but perhaps if other big name authors decide to self-publish there will be less of a stigma about self-published books being the works only of authors who couldn’t find a “real” publisher. It would be great if that was the result of Wideman’s break from the norm.

Read Full Post »